Jump to content

Lemaire channel

 

Chinstrap penguins on Halfmoon Island

 

Penguin tracks

 

Halfmoon Island

 

A memorial cross erected to honour the deaths of British Antarctic Survey members Ambrose C Morgan, Kevin P Ockleton and John Coll, who died on the 14th August 1982,  after the sea ice that they were crossing broke up during a field trip.
A memorial cross erected to honour the deaths of British Antarctic Survey members Ambrose C Morgan, Kevin P Ockleton and John Coll, who died on the 14th August 1982,  after the sea ice that they were crossing broke up during a field trip.

Petermann Island

A memorial cross erected to honour the deaths of British Antarctic Survey members Ambrose C Morgan, Kevin P Ockleton and John Coll, who died on the 14th August 1982, after the sea ice that they were crossing broke up during a field trip.

Leopard Seal Lemaire Channel

 

Iceberg Lemaire Channel

 

Gentoo penguin on Cuverville Island

 

Seal Lemaire channel

 

Blue-eyed shags (cormorants) on Petermann Island

 

Deception Island

 

A whaling station was established on Deception Island by a Norwegian, Captain Adolfus Andresen in 1906. The Aktieselskabet Hektor Whaling Station was built in 1912. The shape of the island (made by a volcano's caldera) offered shelter for whale processing ships. Most of the remains that sit semi-preserved on the beach date from a period between 1906 and 1931 when the whaling industry was most active on shore.
A whaling station was established on Deception Island by a Norwegian, Captain Adolfus Andresen in 1906. The Aktieselskabet Hektor Whaling Station was built in 1912. The shape of the island (made by a volcano's caldera) offered shelter for whale processing ships. Most of the remains that sit semi-preserved on the beach date from a period between 1906 and 1931 when the whaling industry was most active on shore.

Boat at Deception Island

A whaling station was established on Deception Island by a Norwegian, Captain Adolfus Andresen in 1906. The Aktieselskabet Hektor Whaling Station was built in 1912. The shape of the island (made by a volcano's caldera) offered shelter for whale processing ships. Most of the remains that sit semi-preserved on the beach date from a period between 1906 and 1931 when the whaling industry was most active on shore.

In 1944 the buildings erected by the whalers were adapted and used by the British navy as part of Operation Tabarin, giving it the name 'Base B' under their system of code letters. The base was handed on to The British Antarctic Survey when the organisation was created in the early '60s.
In 1944 the buildings erected by the whalers were adapted and used by the British navy as part of Operation Tabarin, giving it the name 'Base B' under their system of code letters. The base was handed on to The British Antarctic Survey when the organisation was created in the early '60s.

Whalers Bay, Deception Island

In 1944 the buildings erected by the whalers were adapted and used by the British navy as part of Operation Tabarin, giving it the name 'Base B' under their system of code letters. The base was handed on to The British Antarctic Survey when the organisation was created in the early '60s.

There were two major volcanic eruptions on Deception Island. One temporarily halted operations in 1967 and another severely damaged the station in 1969, bringing permanent habitation of the buildings to a close. Deception Island remains an active volcano and one of the most visited islands in the South Shetlands. The remains are now protected under the Antarctic Treaty.
There were two major volcanic eruptions on Deception Island. One temporarily halted operations in 1967 and another severely damaged the station in 1969, bringing permanent habitation of the buildings to a close. Deception Island remains an active volcano and one of the most visited islands in the South Shetlands. The remains are now protected under the Antarctic Treaty.

Whaling station on Deception Island

There were two major volcanic eruptions on Deception Island. One temporarily halted operations in 1967 and another severely damaged the station in 1969, bringing permanent habitation of the buildings to a close. Deception Island remains an active volcano and one of the most visited islands in the South Shetlands. The remains are now protected under the Antarctic Treaty.

Chinstrap penguins on Deception Island

 

Lone penguin Petermann Island

 

Bailey Head, Deception Island

 

/