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An iceberg survives the summer melt and drifts in Kongsford

 

For much of the winter Ny-Ålesund is cut off from shipping by ice covering the fjord. The community is reliant on a small airstrip that recieves semi-regular flights from nearby Longyearbyen, as conditions allow.
For much of the winter Ny-Ålesund is cut off from shipping by ice covering the fjord. The community is reliant on a small airstrip that recieves semi-regular flights from nearby Longyearbyen, as conditions allow.

Arriving at Ny-Ålesund in the Spring season when the sea ice begins to thaw

For much of the winter Ny-Ålesund is cut off from shipping by ice covering the fjord. The community is reliant on a small airstrip that recieves semi-regular flights from nearby Longyearbyen, as conditions allow.

Driving back from the radio telescope looking out across Kongsfjord

 

Two ornamental snow lions stand guard outside the Polar Research Institute of China at Ny-Ålesund, called the Yellow River Station. China has become very keen to develop its interests in the Arctic region building the station in 2004. China is also building its second icebreaker, already owning one of the largest non-nuclear powered icebreakers in the world.
Two ornamental snow lions stand guard outside the Polar Research Institute of China at Ny-Ålesund, called the Yellow River Station. China has become very keen to develop its interests in the Arctic region building the station in 2004. China is also building its second icebreaker, already owning one of the largest non-nuclear powered icebreakers in the world.

Snow lions outside China Station

Two ornamental snow lions stand guard outside the Polar Research Institute of China at Ny-Ålesund, called the Yellow River Station. China has become very keen to develop its interests in the Arctic region building the station in 2004. China is also building its second icebreaker, already owning one of the largest non-nuclear powered icebreakers in the world.

Many of the different research stations at Ny-Ålesund carry visual references to the nation that they represent. It's becoming increasingly important, perhaps not just for scientific reasons, that countries have a presence in the Arctic.
Many of the different research stations at Ny-Ålesund carry visual references to the nation that they represent. It's becoming increasingly important, perhaps not just for scientific reasons, that countries have a presence in the Arctic.

Name plate on India's research station

Many of the different research stations at Ny-Ålesund carry visual references to the nation that they represent. It's becoming increasingly important, perhaps not just for scientific reasons, that countries have a presence in the Arctic.

The Vaskerilab at Ny-Ålesund, with Kongsfjord in the background

 

Roald Amundsen used Ny-Ålesund as a starting point to launch his airship Norge to fly to the North Pole in 1926. This statue was built to commemorate the flight.
Roald Amundsen used Ny-Ålesund as a starting point to launch his airship Norge to fly to the North Pole in 1926. This statue was built to commemorate the flight.

Coatguard sailors at the statue of Roald Amundsen

Roald Amundsen used Ny-Ålesund as a starting point to launch his airship Norge to fly to the North Pole in 1926. This statue was built to commemorate the flight.

Polar dogs are great companions in the polar environment, as well as being very useful for transport. Some of the Ny-Ålesund residents keep dogs to pull sleds across the snow and ice in winter.
Polar dogs are great companions in the polar environment, as well as being very useful for transport. Some of the Ny-Ålesund residents keep dogs to pull sleds across the snow and ice in winter.

Girl and polar dog outside the dog kennels

Polar dogs are great companions in the polar environment, as well as being very useful for transport. Some of the Ny-Ålesund residents keep dogs to pull sleds across the snow and ice in winter.

This Arctic fox wore a few tags in its ears, sleeping under a scientist's cabin it was unable to escape being a source of investigation. Researchers at Ny-Ålesund are not ones to miss an opportunity to collect data, so this fox will maybe yield some new findings about behaviour someday!
This Arctic fox wore a few tags in its ears, sleeping under a scientist's cabin it was unable to escape being a source of investigation. Researchers at Ny-Ålesund are not ones to miss an opportunity to collect data, so this fox will maybe yield some new findings about behaviour someday!

Arctic fox shows of its darker summer coat

This Arctic fox wore a few tags in its ears, sleeping under a scientist's cabin it was unable to escape being a source of investigation. Researchers at Ny-Ålesund are not ones to miss an opportunity to collect data, so this fox will maybe yield some new findings about behaviour someday!

View looking out of a lab owned by the Norwegian Polar Institute

 

A researcher maintains the radio telescope

 

Cycling through a mild snowstorm on Ny-Ålesund.

 

The post office at Ny-Ålesund -one of the furthest north post offices in the world

 

A member of a colony of Kittiwakes on cliffs near to Ny-Ålesund, their proximity to the international Arctic research settlement makes study of them easier over time.
A member of a colony of Kittiwakes on cliffs near to Ny-Ålesund, their proximity to the international Arctic research settlement makes study of them easier over time.

A Kittiwake flying high above one of the mountains surrounding Ny-Ålesund

A member of a colony of Kittiwakes on cliffs near to Ny-Ålesund, their proximity to the international Arctic research settlement makes study of them easier over time.

Nearby cabin that scientists use for daytrips

 

Relics from Ny-Ålesund's industrial past

 

The international scientific research settlement of Ny-Ålesund, 1,200 Kilometres from the North Pole, provides an Arctic base for a wide range of studies in natural sciences. Eleven institutions from ten countries around the world have research stations in the settlement, three of which are permanently manned.
The international scientific research settlement of Ny-Ålesund, 1,200 Kilometres from the North Pole, provides an Arctic base for a wide range of studies in natural sciences. Eleven institutions from ten countries around the world have research stations in the settlement, three of which are permanently manned.

Walkways provide a path above the snow and protect pipes running underneath

The international scientific research settlement of Ny-Ålesund, 1,200 Kilometres from the North Pole, provides an Arctic base for a wide range of studies in natural sciences. Eleven institutions from ten countries around the world have research stations in the settlement, three of which are permanently manned.

The quayside of Ny-Ålesund hosts research vessels, supply ships and the occasional crusie ship

 

The research vessel Viking Explorer working off Ny-Ålesund

 

A relic of Ny-Ålesund's coal mining past left on the shoreline of the fjord. This train used to pull coal trucks out to the quayside to load onto ships. The remaining coal now lies forgotten in a seam deep underneath the mountain behind the settlement. Much of the research conducted at Ny-Ålesund now is about the climate change -which was primarily caused by the burning of coal worldwide.
A relic of Ny-Ålesund's coal mining past left on the shoreline of the fjord. This train used to pull coal trucks out to the quayside to load onto ships. The remaining coal now lies forgotten in a seam deep underneath the mountain behind the settlement. Much of the research conducted at Ny-Ålesund now is about the climate change -which was primarily caused by the burning of coal worldwide.

Coal train from Ny-Ålesund's mining past

A relic of Ny-Ålesund's coal mining past left on the shoreline of the fjord. This train used to pull coal trucks out to the quayside to load onto ships. The remaining coal now lies forgotten in a seam deep underneath the mountain behind the settlement. Much of the research conducted at Ny-Ålesund now is about the climate change -which was primarily caused by the burning of coal worldwide.

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