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One of the boats used by scientists to service the ocean acidification experiment, heads out to check on the 'mesocosms', newly installed in Kongsfjord (middle distance, in three rows of three).
One of the boats used by scientists to service the ocean acidification experiment, heads out to check on the 'mesocosms', newly installed in Kongsfjord (middle distance, in three rows of three).

Going to Sample

One of the boats used by scientists to service the ocean acidification experiment, heads out to check on the 'mesocosms', newly installed in Kongsfjord (middle distance, in three rows of three).

A 'scientist's eye view' of a pteropod looking into the eyepiece of a microscope in the marine laboratory at Ny-Ålesund. The pteropod, or "sea butterfly", is a small marine animal threatened by ocean acidification. Pteropods are a fundamental part of the food web, commonly consumed by by fish, seabirds and whales. Like shellfish, corals and other molluscs, they need calcium carbonate (arogonite) to form their shells and structures. However, increased CO2 emissions from human industry are causing ocean water to trend towards acidity, which is not only reducing the capability of these species to form shells, but actually causing existing shells to dissolve.
A 'scientist's eye view' of a pteropod looking into the eyepiece of a microscope in the marine laboratory at Ny-Ålesund. The pteropod, or "sea butterfly", is a small marine animal threatened by ocean acidification. Pteropods are a fundamental part of the food web, commonly consumed by by fish, seabirds and whales. Like shellfish, corals and other molluscs, they need calcium carbonate (arogonite) to form their shells and structures. However, increased CO2 emissions from human industry are causing ocean water to trend towards acidity, which is not only reducing the capability of these species to form shells, but actually causing existing shells to dissolve.

Pteropod

A 'scientist's eye view' of a pteropod looking into the eyepiece of a microscope in the marine laboratory at Ny-Ålesund. The pteropod, or "sea butterfly", is a small marine animal threatened by ocean acidification. Pteropods are a fundamental part of the food web, commonly consumed by by fish, seabirds and whales. Like shellfish, corals and other molluscs, they need calcium carbonate (arogonite) to form their shells and structures. However, increased CO2 emissions from human industry are causing ocean water to trend towards acidity, which is not only reducing the capability of these species to form shells, but actually causing existing shells to dissolve.

The mesocosms which will be used in the experiment are temporarily unloaded on the quayside at Ny-Alesund to be setup for istallation in the fjord.
The mesocosms which will be used in the experiment are temporarily unloaded on the quayside at Ny-Alesund to be setup for istallation in the fjord.

Quayside

The mesocosms which will be used in the experiment are temporarily unloaded on the quayside at Ny-Alesund to be setup for istallation in the fjord.

Scientists from the German marine research institute IFM-GEOMAR pull aboard the 'bags' (huge flexible test-tubes used to contain the water column for testing the effects of Co2 on ocean organisms) in their experiment to investigate ocean acidification. Kongsfjord near the Arctic scientific research station of Ny-Alesund in Svalbard.
Scientists from the German marine research institute IFM-GEOMAR pull aboard the 'bags' (huge flexible test-tubes used to contain the water column for testing the effects of Co2 on ocean organisms) in their experiment to investigate ocean acidification. Kongsfjord near the Arctic scientific research station of Ny-Alesund in Svalbard.

Lifting one of the bags over the ship's rail

Scientists from the German marine research institute IFM-GEOMAR pull aboard the 'bags' (huge flexible test-tubes used to contain the water column for testing the effects of Co2 on ocean organisms) in their experiment to investigate ocean acidification. Kongsfjord near the Arctic scientific research station of Ny-Alesund in Svalbard.

Lowering one of the bags into the fjord

 

Small boats used to secure the mesocosms

 

Scientists from the German marine research institute IFM-GEOMAR dive in the freezing water of Kongsfjord to open the 'bags' so that the mesocosms can be taken to pieces and transported back to Kiele in Germany.
Scientists from the German marine research institute IFM-GEOMAR dive in the freezing water of Kongsfjord to open the 'bags' so that the mesocosms can be taken to pieces and transported back to Kiele in Germany.

Diver prepares to close the bottom of the bags

Scientists from the German marine research institute IFM-GEOMAR dive in the freezing water of Kongsfjord to open the 'bags' so that the mesocosms can be taken to pieces and transported back to Kiele in Germany.

Referred to as 'the roofs', these plastic covers being carried by the scientists shield the experiment from contamination by seabirds. The birds would otherwise gather on the complex structures, jeopardising the data produced. The spikes deter birds (often attracted by scientists' orange suits, mistaking them for fishermen) from landing on the instruments.
Referred to as 'the roofs', these plastic covers being carried by the scientists shield the experiment from contamination by seabirds. The birds would otherwise gather on the complex structures, jeopardising the data produced. The spikes deter birds (often attracted by scientists' orange suits, mistaking them for fishermen) from landing on the instruments.

Roofs

Referred to as 'the roofs', these plastic covers being carried by the scientists shield the experiment from contamination by seabirds. The birds would otherwise gather on the complex structures, jeopardising the data produced. The spikes deter birds (often attracted by scientists' orange suits, mistaking them for fishermen) from landing on the instruments.

Fitting the roof on a mesocosm

 

This device, referred to as a 'spider', is used to inject salt water (for calibration) and later, different concentrations of CO2 into the 'mesocosms'.
This device, referred to as a 'spider', is used to inject salt water (for calibration) and later, different concentrations of CO2 into the 'mesocosms'.

Spider

This device, referred to as a 'spider', is used to inject salt water (for calibration) and later, different concentrations of CO2 into the 'mesocosms'.

Rib

 

Making samples

 

Putting samples into smaller bottles from the a larger bottle that has been delivered to the shoreline at Ny-Ålesund.
Putting samples into smaller bottles from the a larger bottle that has been delivered to the shoreline at Ny-Ålesund.

Sampling for Ocean Acidification tests

Putting samples into smaller bottles from the a larger bottle that has been delivered to the shoreline at Ny-Ålesund.

Sample bottle

 

A scientist working with IFM-GEOMAR takes water samples, newly collected from the mesocosms, back to the  Vaskerilab on Ny-Ålesund for testing and data logging.
A scientist working with IFM-GEOMAR takes water samples, newly collected from the mesocosms, back to the  Vaskerilab on Ny-Ålesund for testing and data logging.

To Lab

A scientist working with IFM-GEOMAR takes water samples, newly collected from the mesocosms, back to the Vaskerilab on Ny-Ålesund for testing and data logging.

Inside one of the Labs

 

The Vaskerilab at Ny-Ålesund, with Kongsfjord in the background. Samples of water from the mesocosms in the fjord are being tested inside the lab.
The Vaskerilab at Ny-Ålesund, with Kongsfjord in the background. Samples of water from the mesocosms in the fjord are being tested inside the lab.

Outside one of the labs at Ny-Ålesund

The Vaskerilab at Ny-Ålesund, with Kongsfjord in the background. Samples of water from the mesocosms in the fjord are being tested inside the lab.

Looking down over the corner of Kongsfjord where three boats belonging to the scientists attend to the nine newly installed mesocosms, which are attached to their moorings.
Looking down over the corner of Kongsfjord where three boats belonging to the scientists attend to the nine newly installed mesocosms, which are attached to their moorings.

The mesocosms installed in the fjord

Looking down over the corner of Kongsfjord where three boats belonging to the scientists attend to the nine newly installed mesocosms, which are attached to their moorings.

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